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Results Shows HotBath Helps Fighting Depression

Results Shows HotBath Helps Fighting Depression

By Editor. October 30, 2018. 12:30pm

There’s perhaps no better elixir than soaking in warm water after a long day. Many of us can attest to the relaxing benefits of unwinding with a hot bath, but did you know it can also help improve your health?

Most ancient cultures have long believed in the healing effects of water. Similar to mindfulness, the Japanese practice of engaging in public baths known as “sento” is used as a way of cleansing both the body and the mind. While we don’t have public baths in the States, we may be able to get the benefits in the privacy of our own homes. In fact, in a modern Japanese home, this is known as “furo.”

That’s right, your own bathtub may be key to literally washing your pain away. Hot water is healing with passive heating

The therapeutic ritual of bathing culture in Japan involves more than just cleansing yourself of physical dirt. From “onsens,” or natural hot springs, to sentos (public baths) and furos (private baths), soaking in these healing waters are a way of purifying from the day-to-day spiritual grime.

Your skin releases endorphins in response to the soothing warm water the same way that endorphins are released when you feel the sun on your skin,” says Dr. Bobby Buka, a dermatologist based in New York. He explains that submerging ourselves in hot water can be both therapeutic and reinvigorating because blood flow increases to the skin.

A warm bath can also improve breathing. The temperature of the water and pressure on your chest increases your lung capacity and oxygen intake. A growing body of research has shown that passive heating, like spending time in a sauna, can also reduce the risk of having a heart attack, improve blood sugar control, and even help lower your blood pressure.

In one eye opening study published earlier this year, researchers collected data from 14 participants and found that soaking in an hourlong hot bath burned as many calories (around 140) as a 30-minute walk. This is because the warm water makes your heart beat faster, giving it a healthy work out. They also found positive anti-inflammatory and blood sugar responses which can protect against illness and infection.

An hourlong hot bath may help:

• reduce risk of a heart attack

• improve blood sugar control

• lower your blood pressure

• burn 140 calories

• protect you from illness and infection

Let’s not forget about the best benefit: pain reduction

Bathing in a sento is a unique cultural and communal experience in Japan. They claim that the hot water from their natural springs can improve blood circulation, calm the nervous system, and help relieve intense pain. While hot spring water isn’t readily available in the States, science shows that we can obtain similar benefits by soaking in a hot tub or visiting a sauna.

Stress causes the muscles of the body to contract,” says Dr. Mark Khorsandi, a migraine surgeon in Houston, Texas. “A hot bath can relieve those symptoms and keep the muscles loose.” Stretching and moving in the water also provides a low-impact workout for discomfort in muscles, joints, and bones.

This has been true for Alaina Leary, 24, who regularly takes hot baths to help manage chronic pain from living with Ehlers-Danlos, a disorder that affects the connective tissues. When she was first diagnosed at the age of 9 in 2002, she recalls feeling extremely breakable. “I was slower than other kids. I had trouble running [and] walking one foot at a time.”

After working with different physical and occupational therapists, she began using warm baths during pain flare-ups. In the evenings, she would set aside time to ease into the tub and let her muscles relax.

Many people who have chronic illnesses report feelings of depression and despair. Khorsandi says hot baths can provide physical comfort and contentment, and can ease the blues that are associated with chronic pain.

Improve mindfulness with an Epsom salt bath

She remembers feeling pins and needles in her hands when she initially found out about her illness back in 2012. “I went through a period of depression after getting diagnosed, not knowing if I was ever going to feel better.”

Through trial and error, she discovered that doing gentle yoga and soaking in weekly baths lessened the constant aches in her joints and muscles. After filling the tub with Epsom salt, she set her phone nearby and listened to guided meditations. Soaking in dissolved Epsom salt can help with muscle soreness and stress, allowing for even greater relaxation.

She now uses her time in the warm water for practicing mindfulness. “One of the things I learned from having an autoimmune disorder is that there is no cure. And not only is there no cure, you’re really kind of on your own in terms of what’s going to make your body feel better,” she says.

Paying closer attention to the sensations in her body has helped Sherman feel more present, in spite of her illness. Now, several years after being diagnosed, she’s noticed significant changes in both her physical and emotional well-being. Restorative bathing like onsen, sento, and furo involves transforming both the mind and soul to have deeper, more meaningful experiences.

“The meditations have taught me that using water is a way of washing off your day and releasing energy.”

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10 Protein Shakes for Weight Loss That Taste Good And Feels Good.

By Adetoun Adeyemo, January 17th, 2018

10 Protein Shakes for Weight Loss That Taste Good And Feels Good.

Are protein shakes right for you? What’s in them, and what should you look for if you’re trying to choose one?

Almost everyone can get enough protein from foods. Healthy adults should get about 45 to 56 grams of protein a day.

If you exercise regularly, you may need more calories and protein — from any source.

Protein shakes are used mainly by athletes who need nourishment right after their workouts, says Jose Antonio, chief executive officer and co-founder of the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN).

Protein shakes can range in their protein content, but all contain some carbohydrates and maybe a little fat. They come a variety flavors in powder form or in ready-to-drink packages, such as cans or foil packs.

Choosing a Protein Shake

Read the label.

Protein shakes vary in protein content. “If you’re a bodybuilder, you’re going to shift to the drinks that have a bit more protein. And I also recommend JUICE PLUS as the next best thing to fruits and vegetable. Try JUICE PLUS COMPLETE to to your Protein Shakes says, Editor,…

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BLUEBERRY-PEANUT BUTTER SMOOTHIE
Ingredients:
2 tbsp. whey protein
1 banana
1/2 c. blueberries (fresh or frozen)
1 tbsp. peanut butter
1/4 c. almond milk
1 c. ice
Directions: In a blender, combine ingredients and blend until smooth.
Recipe courtesy of Delish.

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CREAMY WATERCRESS HEALTHY PROTEIN BOOSTER
Ingredients1 banana
½ cup strawberries
½ cup watercress
½ cup almond milk
½ cup ice
Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Makes one 12-ounce serving.
Recipe courtesy of EasyHealthySmoothie.
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GET-UP-AND-GO PROTEIN SMOOTHIE
Ingredients:
¼ c. espresso
½ c. vanilla soy milk
1 tbsp. cashew butter
1 large banana
2 ice cubes
Directions: Combine all ingredients in a blender. Process until smooth. Serve immediately.
Recipe courtesy of Delish.

 

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PIÑA COLADA PROTEIN SMOOTHIE
Ingredients:
1 can coconut milk
1 banana
2/3 c. frozen pineapple
1/3 c. frozen mango
1 scoop protein powder
pineapple wedge, for garnish
Directions: Combine coconut milk, banana, pineapple, mango and protein powder in a blender and blend on high until smooth.
Garnish with a wedge of pineapple and serve.
Recipe courtesy of Delish.

 

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RASPBERRY-BANANA PROTEIN SHAKE
Ingredients1 scoop raw rice protein
½ banana
1 tbsp almond butter
1 tsp chia seeds
1 tsp flax seeds
1 handful raspberries
8-12 oz water (or for a thicker shake, use unsweetened coconut milk)
Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Makes one 12-ounce serving.
Recipe courtesy of Jessica Geier, holistic health coach and President of Raw Generation Inc.caption

 

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HIGH-PROTEIN SMOOTHIE WITH VANILLA BEAN Ingredients 1 cup low-fat milk 1 banana, sliced 1 tbsp almond butter ½ cup shelled frozen edamame 1 vanilla bean Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Makes one 12-ounce serving. Recipe courtesy of Amy Gorin, R.D.N., owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey.

 

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PEACHES ‘N’ CREAM SHAKE Ingredients 1 cup frozen sliced peaches 1 cup frozen strawberries 1 cup fresh orange juice 6 ounces peach-flavored 2% Greek yogurt ½ cup frozen pineapple chunks Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Makes one 12-ounce serving. Reprinted with permission from The Women’s Health Big Book of Smoothies & Soups by Lisa DeFazio, R.D.
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GREEN PEAS PROTEIN BOMB Ingredients 1 cup green peas 1 banana ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ¼ cup ice Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Makes one 12-ounce serving. Recipe courtesy of EasyHealthySmoothie.

 

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PUMPKIN PIE SMOOTHIE Ingredients 1 cup low-fat milk ¾ cup pumpkin puree 1 tbsp almond butter ⅛ tsp ground nutmeg ¼ tsp ground cloves 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp honey 4 ice cubes Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Makes one 12-ounce serving. Recipe courtesy of Amy Gorin, R.D.N., owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, New Jersey.

 

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SNICKERDOODLE SMOOTHIE Ingredients 3 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder 1 tbsp agave nectar 2 tbsp flax meal ⅓ cup peanut butter ½ tsp vanilla extract ¼ tsp kosher salt 1 frozen banana, peeled and chopped 1 ½ cups vanilla almond milk 1 scoop protein powder of choice Directions: Blend all ingredients together until smooth. Add more almond milk if you’d like a thinner consistency. Makes two 12-ounce servings. Recipe courtesy of Claire Thomas of Kitchy Kitchen.

 

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